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I Want My Child to...

“Many studies show that young people cite their parents most frequently as the main influence in their occupational plans. No other group even comes close.”
--Sarah M. Shoffner and Richard H. Klemer, 1973

What do you really want for your child? Gee, that seems easy to figure out! But it always helps to think it through. If you like, click on Print below to take this short assessment and rank your top three choices by entering 1-3.

I want my child to

____ have personal happiness

____ have a feeling that her career is fulfilling

____ follow in my footsteps

____ have a career that strongly relates to personal interests and strengths

____ have a career with high earning potential

____ work in the family business

____ experience high risk, adventure, and challenge in a career

____ have fame and fortune

____ have financial security, but riches aren’t necessary

____ serve the community

____ be financially independent by age 30

____ help others before personal gain

____ other (explain to yourself!_______________________________)

How do you think your child would respond? Rank what you think her top three choices are – or let her do it herself!

I want to

____ have personal happiness

____ have a feeling that my career is fulfilling

____ follow in my parent’s footsteps

____ have a career that strongly relates to personal interests and strengths

____ have a career with high earning potential

____ work in the family business

____ experience high risk, adventure, and challenge in a career

____ have fame and fortune

____ have financial security, but riches aren’t necessary

____ serve the community

____ be financially independent by age 30

____ help others before personal gain

____ other (explain to yourself!_______________________________)

Print

What do your choices tell you? Are you focused on monetary gain or self-fulfillment for your child? Security or risk? When helping your child plan for future success, always try to keep in mind:

  • what you truly want for your child,
  • not to impose your “wants” as more important than your child’s desires,
  • whatever you and your child identify to be most important, only careful planning will make it happen, and
  • a solid career plan is for everyone – the person who wants to make a million dollars by age 30 and the person who wants nothing more than to play the harp and move people to tears through music.

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